A Criminal Defense Attorney Explains Assault, Battery, and Aggravated Assault

Criminal Lawyers

When someone is accusing you of a crime involving a physical attack, you are likely concerned that there is no good defense or you may be completely shocked by the accusation. However, when it comes to crimes involving physical attack, it is not just “assault.” In fact, there are many different crimes that someone could be accusing you of, including assault, battery, and aggravated assault. When someone is accusing you of one of these crimes, it is important to know exactly what they are accusing you of and speak with a criminal defense attorney as soon as possible to ensure your case is in good hands from the start. For more information on how a trusted attorney can help you with your case, please reach out to our office now. Remember, your reputation and possible criminal record are on the line.

What is an assault?

When someone is accusing you of assault, it likely falls into the category where they are accusing you of intentionally trying to cause fear of harm to another person. This means that you did not necessarily cause someone physical harm. The act of intentionally making someone scared that you will physically harm them is also considered assault. An example of this would be if someone is holding a baseball bat and says to another person “You’ll pay for what you did!” while drawing back the baseball bat. A physical attack has not even occurred yet, but the assault has happened.

What is “assault and battery”?

When someone commits assault and battery, they are essentially going through with the intent to commit harm. In fact, when someone assaults and batters another person, the act does not even have to be physically damaging or cause the individual harm. It can simply constitute an act that was offensive. If you spit on someone else, it likely did not cause them harm, but the act was offensive. Likewise, if you threaten to strike someone and then follow through with hitting them and injuring them, this is also assault and battery.

What is aggravated assault?

Typically, a court will classify an assault case either as simple or aggravated. They determine this based on the severity of harm inflicted on the alleged victim. If someone is accusing you of aggravated assault, it is a felony, and it usually means that there was some type of weapon involved in the alleged assault or that there was an intent to commit a very serious crime. In certain states, aggravated assault can happen when the assault occurs in a relationship that the state deems as “specially protected.” An example of this could be a doctor-patient relationship.

Get the Help You Need from Our Team

If you have been accused of assault, assault, and battery, or aggravated assault, you should not have to deal with this on your own. These are very serious charges that could not only damage your reputation, but that could also land you in prison and with a record. For more information on how our team can help you, please reach out to an attorney now.

Source: Criminal Lawyers Bloomington, IL, Pioletti & Pioletti

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